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*An interface to gdb. Michael Smolsky <fnsiguc@weizmann.weizmann.ac.il> wrote:
 
*An interface to gdb. Michael Smolsky <fnsiguc@weizmann.weizmann.ac.il> wrote:
 
*:I was thinking about a tool, which could be very useful for me in my numerical simulation work.  It is an interconnection between gdb and octave.  We are often managing very large arrays of data in our fortran or c codes, which might be studied with the help of octave at the algorithm development stages.  Assume you're coding, say, wave equation.  And want to debug the code.  It would be great to pick some array from the memory of the code you're developing, fft it and see the image as a log-log plot of the spectral density.  I'm facing similar problems now.  To avoid high c-development cost, I develop in matlab/octave, and then rewrite into c.  It might be so much easier, if I could off-load a c array right from the debugger into octave, study it, and, perhaps, change some [many] values with a convenient matlab/octave syntax, similar to <code>a(:,51:250)=zeros(100,200)</code>, and then store it back into the memory of my c code.
 
*:I was thinking about a tool, which could be very useful for me in my numerical simulation work.  It is an interconnection between gdb and octave.  We are often managing very large arrays of data in our fortran or c codes, which might be studied with the help of octave at the algorithm development stages.  Assume you're coding, say, wave equation.  And want to debug the code.  It would be great to pick some array from the memory of the code you're developing, fft it and see the image as a log-log plot of the spectral density.  I'm facing similar problems now.  To avoid high c-development cost, I develop in matlab/octave, and then rewrite into c.  It might be so much easier, if I could off-load a c array right from the debugger into octave, study it, and, perhaps, change some [many] values with a convenient matlab/octave syntax, similar to <code>a(:,51:250)=zeros(100,200)</code>, and then store it back into the memory of my c code.
 
*Implement gdb extensions for Octave types. Octave has the <code>etc/gdbinit</code> file, which has some basic support for displaying the contents of Octave types. Add more extensions to make it easier to debug octave_values and other Octave types.
 
  
 
*Add a definition to lgrind so that it supports Octave. (See http://www.tex.ac.uk/tex-archive/support/lgrind/ for more information about lgrind.)
 
*Add a definition to lgrind so that it supports Octave. (See http://www.tex.ac.uk/tex-archive/support/lgrind/ for more information about lgrind.)

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